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Heritage Grey Highlands

Heritage Grey Highlands

Heritage Grey Highlands is the heritage committee for the Municipality and operates as a subcommittee of the Museum and Heritage Advisory Committee. 

Heritage PlaqueHeritage Properties Designated under s. IV of the Ontario Heritage Act:

If property is designated under the Ontario Heritage Act:

  • Designation is registered on title
  • Building permit applications for additions or renovations are reviewed by Grey Highlands Council and Heritage Committee to ensure suitability
  • Owners of designated properties, like all property owners, must maintain property to the basic standards of the municipal maintenenace and occupancy by-laws
  • Although not obligated under the Act, owners usually choose to maintain designated properties in good repair using appropriate colours and materials
  • Many owners request designation in order to preserve their efforts for use and enjoyment of future generations. 

Some advantages to designation:

  • Designation may provide access to grants, loans or tax relief to assist property owners with conservation and/or maintenance of the property
  • Legislated protection from inappropriate development on nearby properties
  • Higher property value and faster resale (proven Shipley report - University of Waterloo)
  • Listed on Historic Places of Canada - great advertising for business

Armstrong/Hickling House

Built C 1872-73 By John W. Armstrong - 25 Sydenham Street, Flesferton 

History

First owned by J. Beattie, then M. Richardson, in 1871 the property was purchased by John W. Armstrong, prominent merchant and an early settler in Flesherton. Soon after, Armstrong built this large family residence where he lived for 48 years. In 1922, his son-in-law Fred Hickling purchased the house.
F.H.W. Hickling emigrated from England in April 1891 when he was 23 years old. In 1901 he married Adelaide Elizabeth, one of the four Armstrong daughters. (After she passed away in 1941, he later married her niece Dorothy.) Hickling initially worked ten years as a book keeper in the M.K. Richardson store, then spent another five years at the store of J&W Boyd. Although he bought into the partnership with the Boyd Brothers, in 1906 he sold his interest and moved to Sault Ste. Marie. Upon his return to Flesherton in 1911, he opened his own dry goods store at 16 Toronto Street, where he continued to operate until his death in 1961 at age 92. Among his many community activities, he was active in the Masons and also served as town treasurer. Early 2000’s the house was a popular B&B. Randy and Nancy Simon, owners since 2011, are working to repair and restore the property and hope eventually to reopen as a B&B.

Architecture

A prominent landmark, this Victorian Queen Anne House is found on page 80 in Ruth Cathcart’s “How Firm a Foundation”. The polychromatic brick-work features elaborate segmented window treatments and unusual tri-color courses that divide the elevation. Advancing and retreating wall planes, jutting out bay windows and complicated roof design are typically Queen Anne as are the three ornate chimneys. However the unusual square one-room turret above the main entry shows definite influence of Second Empire style, only just becoming locally popular at time of building. A butler pass-through to the dining room and much original woodwork add interest to the interior.

Designation

July 9, 2001 By-law 2001-48 (Municipality of Grey Highlands).  Exterior attributes protected under the designation include all elevations and brickwork, all dormers and brick chimneys, the principal entrance door and windows as well as the pine tree at the NW corner of the house. Interior attributes include original wood trim, decorative plaster and light fixtures as well as the principal staircase.  

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property.

Photo Gallery

Photo Gallery: Armstrong Hickling House will appear here on the public site.

Haskett House - AKA F.t. Hill Candy Factory

Built C 1895 by George Haskett 81 Main Street east, Markdale (Private Residence) 

History

William Haskett was a prominent early settler to Markdale. 1860’s records show him operating a hotel with his brother Robert in what was then called “Cornabus”. 1867 William’s older brother George walked from Owen Sound to help open a tin-smith business which in 1874 they expanded into a hardware store located at the south-east corner of Toronto & Main. A substantial brick house c.1895 was built on land subdivided from lot 101 (1854 crown grant 50 acres to George Walker). 1918, G. Haskett’s widow sold to F.T. Hill who later used the building to make “hard” candy, and also for worker housing. 1950’s he also made chocolates. After F.T.’s 1962 death, the building was abandoned until sold by his estate in 1967 at which time it reverted to again being a residence. Extensive additions, renovations, and restorations by subsequent owners have ensured the preservation of this (by local standards) unique heritage landmark.

Architecture

Local red brick likely from Bowler Brickworks in Cheeseville is used in an unusual double-brick “common bond” pattern where the number of stretcher rows flanked by header rows varies between the standard five to as many as eight. Windows with rounded corners are defined by “eared” buff-color vousoirs framed in black brick, then further enhanced by “banding” in an unusual variation of a locally popular motif. Ornate Tuscan-style frieze and cornices supporting eaves and the entablature over an advancing bay results in a unique blend of “Italianate” with neo-classical. A complex pattern of crown moldings and well-crafted bas-relief ceiling medallions grace the interior. Plaster cornices and wide oval arches that frame bay window spaces are reminiscent of the Italian Renaissance architect Palladio whose designs later became a popular classic revival style in England and “the colonies”. The covered semi-circular porch added 2013 features reproductions of original cornice and frieze detailing. The mullioned, five-sided conservatory added to the west side in 1997 offers a good view of other historic homes. Rear additions also compliment the house.

Culture Significance 

The Haskett Brothers and Franklin T. Hill were prominent citizens who contributed greatly to the economic development of Markdale. Chocolates and other candy from 81 Main East would have been sold at F.T. Hill stores throughout Southern Ontario. Students playing hooky from neighboring Beavercrest School could generally be tracked down next door.

Designation

July 6, 2015, By-law 2015-44 Municipality of Grey Highlands. Physical design attributes include decorative brickwork, cornice & frieze, interior arches & moldings.  

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property.

Photo Gallery

Coming soon

Kerr's Bridge

Built early 1880's. Relocated 1906 by Euphrasia Township SR 22C at Beaver River (West of Grey 13)

Known History

Pioneering bridges were frequently named after a nearby property owner. James Kerr (first Reeve of Euphrasia Township) owned the area around this bridge from c.1851 and well into the 1900s. The original (likely log) Kerr's Bridge on 21-22 Side-road (this location) was declared unsafe in 1880 and was replaced in 1881 (judging by the amount paid) by another wooden structure. May of 1893, spring flooding washed out all bridges on the Beaver River thus requiring replacement or extensive repairs. James Kerr was again paid an amount appropriate to erect or repair a wooden bridge. Spring 1906, Kerr’s bridge was once more declared unsafe. Shortly afterwards James Kerr was paid a much larger fee to “enclose the cribs” which could well indicate creating the concrete abutments by enclosing the original stone. Additional 1906 council memos indicate James Kerr was also paid to install a metal truss, and mention made of a huge amount of cedar delivered to the site, possibly “planking” for the road bed.

It is entirely feasible that the c.1880s bridge crossing the Beaver River at 22C today, was moved from some other location (as yet unknown) to be reused 1906-7 as a replacement for the condemned wooden bridge. As unusual as this may seem, these “mechano-style” bridges were easy to relocate, so mention of that fact in records might not have seemed important. Perhaps a busy road needed a wider bridge and Hamilton Bridge facilitated re-purposing this bridge to a quieter road like 22C.

(Sources: Euphrasia History Book & newspaper accounts of Council minutes)

ENGINEERING DETAILS

The truss is completed as follows.  Top chord and end post: back to back channels with v-lacing and cover plate;  Vertical members: Back-to-back channels with v-lacing on each side; Hip Vertical: up-set style eyebars with supplementary rods added at a later date; Diagonal members: up-set style eyebars; Bottom chord: up-set style eyebars, expect for center panels which are replaced with channel; Portal bracing: Unusual pedimented design composed of paired angles connect by v-lacing and plate, and with curved knee braces composed of a single angle;  Struts: tow pairs of angles with v-lacing and knees composed of a single peice of angle;  Overhead lateral bracing: Square rod with turnbuckles;  Floor beams: replacement, composed of modern rolled Wide flange beams; Lower lateral bracing: replacement rods. 

Information used with permission of Nathan Holth - HistoricBridges.org. More details @ http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ontario/sideroad22c/#photosvideos 

Cultural Significance

Pin-connected truss bridges of any kind are very rare in Ontario today, and this particular bridge is one of the finest examples of a pin-connected truss bridge in the province. This elegant bridge also appears as though it may be one of the oldest pin-connected truss bridges in Ontario having a style suggestive of an older truss that perhaps dates to early 1880s. The most visually striking feature that sets it apart from other bridges of this type is its unusual pedimented portal bracing, an ornamental design more commonly found on the older pin-connected truss bridges. Another design feature more common to older pin-connected through truss bridges is the "boxy" manner in which the top chord ends abruptly over the end post, rather than blending into the end post without a vertical face at the end. The ends of the top chord are faced with cast iron plaques crediting Hamilton Bridge Co. as the builder, but giving no date. Stylistically, the details of the bridge are consistent for a bridge built in 1880s, and the Hamilton Bridge Company was in operation during this time, with the Norwich Bridge supporting both of these statements. Concrete abutments which are not consistent with that time period logically must date from after 1905. Since dismantling and re-assembling pin truss bridges was quite simple and also a common occurrence, records support the likelihood of this particular bridge (original location unknown) being re-assembled on this site c.1906/7.

Designation

By-law 2016-74 Municipality of Grey Highlands protects this very rare landmark bridge which may be of national significance. 

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property.

Photo Gallery

Coming soon

Old Markdale Firehall

BUILT 1913 BY VILLAGE OF MARKDALE

19 TORONTO STREET NORTH, MARKDALE

History

The original building was designed as a two-story fire hall with a tall tower that provided drying space for the canvas hoses and also housed a large bell for signaling a fire. Use of the bell for alarm purposes ceased in 1944 when an automatic system was installed. A later addition to the hall (south side) had a weigh scale set into the floor. This feature was used as an auto-mechanic area to keep fire engines whatever their vintage in top repair. For many years the bell was rung at noon and 6pm. In the 1930’s and 40’s, Edgar Bowles boarded in town and twice daily climbed to the second floor to ring the bell. He also maintained the weigh station and charged 25 cents a weigh for a small truck load. For more than 80 years the hall was staffed by a volunteer fire brigade. The seven fire chiefs who led these unsung heroes are commemorated on a plaque in the new fire hall, erected 1995. After that date, the building housed a variety of community services including Chamber of Commerce, Agricultural Society, Tourist Information and a weekly Farmers Market. 2012 the hall was closed due to safety concerns. After designation the municipality sold to Chris Steele who created Fire & Ice, a casual venue for fire-roasted coffee, local ice cream plus food, drink, entertainment, WIFI and a great atmosphere. 

Architecture

The simple, purpose-built structure with few embellishments uses locally made red brick (mostly double bond). The 75 foot tower, used for drying canvas hoses, is unusually tall for this type of structure and features texture courses for triple-bond, a modified onion dome with finial and is also a distinctive visual landmark. The four open tower bays were enclosed to prevent further water damage. The large alarm bell that is still in the tower may eventually be brought down for display purposes. The original windows which had been boarded up were replaced in the renovation. The south wall of the building is painted with a nostalgic mural of the (demolished) Markdale train station.

Cultural Significance 

As many of the early homes and businesses were of log or board-and-batten construction, Markdale suffered several tragic fires, especially in the Mill and Main Street business blocks. Volunteer fire fighters considered it a simple matter of civic duty to respond to these fires as well as to vehicular crashes and other emergencies. On sunny days it was not uncommon for the large door to be open so people could admire the shiny red engine. Occasionally fully suited firemen turned Hwy 10 into a toll road, soliciting donations from passing cars. As home to the farmers’ market and tourist information, the fire hall attracted many visitors, and in its new role continues to attract both locals and tourists. This unique, highly recognizable landmark is important to the visual streetscape as well as to the cultural heritage of the town and surrounding area.

Designation

By-law 2013-59 Municipality of Grey Highlands protects the entire 1913 portion of the structure as well as the iconic landmark status of the tower. 

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property.

Photo Gallery

Coming soon

Markdale Public School

 BUILT 1895 – GLENELG SCHOOL BOARD - VICTORIA ST AT ELIZA, MARKDALE

History

1853 the first Markdale School, built of logs, was located ½ mile south of town. 1869 a frame school was built near Barrhead for children from the west end of town. 1879 a small brick school house for children in the east and south part of the village was erected on the present site of the Roman Catholic Church. 1888 the two schools joined by moving the frame building in behind the brick one, but both burned down within the year. 1890 a new school was constructed at the top of Eliza Street. 4 years later, it too went up in flames. 1895 on the same site Markdale Public School was built. 1920 a 3-room addition provided a continuation school, and the building became Markdale High School. 1952 high school students were transferred to Centre Grey High School on Main, and 1967 transferred to newly built Grey Highlands S.S. in Flesherton. All except grades one & two moved to the school on Main (re-named as Beavercrest). 1975 the remaining students moved over and the old building became archive storage and a teacher resource centre. Late 1985 regardless of community opposition, the school was torn down. In 1987 the location was marked by a carillon constructed of the red bricks and topped with the school’s bell. These days even the bell is missing.

Architecture

The symmetry, proportions and fine details are typical of public buildings in that era. The four room school had a rubble stone foundation and was constructed of local red brick. Louvered arches on all four sides of the belfry mirror the rounded windows and the fan light above the entry door, all of which are beautifully accented by the fine craftsmanship of the brickwork. Architect J.C. Forester also designed the Carnegie Library on the south side of Main St. East.

Designation

May 30, 1985: By-law 85-8 (Village of Markdale) - Reasons for designation included historical importance, fine architecture and its prominent position atop a hill making the belfry a highly visible landmark to the town of Markdale. Despite being designated, the school board ordered the school to be demolished – gone but still not forgotten by several generations of students who passed beneath the elegant arched transom during those 90 years.

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property.

Photo Gallery

Coming soon

Munshaw Hotel 

 BUILT C. 1864 BY AARON MUNSHAW 1 TORONTO STREET, FLESHERTON

History

Aaron Munshaw Sr (born 1796) is acknowledged as the first settler in Artemesia Corners, now the village of Flesherton (named for W.K. Flesher, another early settler and land owner). Munshaw’s ancestors (originally Mundschauser) who had immigrated 1743 to Philadelphia from the Palatinate in the Old German Empire, moved to Upper Canada in 1792 to benefit from Governor Simcoe’s offer of free land to settlers. Aaron Sr. was a veteran of the War of 1812, serving in Captain Button’s Light Horse Militia. When he got into trouble for activities as a political reformer and a supporter of William Lyon Mackenzie’s 1837 Rebellion, he first escaped to the United States, then later he and his wife walked from Thornhill along roads “not yet brushed out” to the junction of the Toronto-Sydenham Road with the Durham Rd (a location he possibly knew of from his fellow rebel, David Gibson who was surveying the area at that time). The first hotel was south of the intersection (across from the cemetery.) In 1849 he relocated to the present site: the south east corner of Hwy 10 and the Durham Rd (Hwy 4). “Pioneers in the Queens Bush” mentions the hotel as a welcome stop-over place for new settlers. In 1864 the existing two-storey structure was added to the establishment which provided stables and lodging for travellers making the slow journey north on horseback. The hotel, which fell on hard times during prohibition in the 1920s, was successively owned until 1964 by five generations of the Munshaw family.

Architecture

The structure is an excellent example of the well-balanced proportions typical of the Georgian style which is quite rare in the local area, since the style was out of fashion by the time early settlers began permanent buildings. Built of local timber and brick, the use of contrasting brick for corner quoins and segmented vousoirs further accents’ the careful placement of all design elements. In 1989 Architect Paul Dawson replicated the original porch from an early photo.

Cultural Significance 

Before any churches were built, services were held in the taproom, as were elections and political meetings. In the early 1900’s, the square in front of the hotel was the site of the important Spring Horse Fair which attracted buyers from a wide area. When cars became more prominent, gasoline pumps were installed, and then later removed. The building still functions as an Inn and Bistro, and continues to be a prominent social and visual community landmark.

Designation

April 3, 1990 By-law 7-90 (Village of Flesherton) for visual and historic importance to the community. The Ontario Heritage Foundation donated $150,000 for restoration.

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property.

Photo Gallery

Coming soon

Old Durham Road Cemetery 

 ESTABLISHED C. 1849 - 325473 DURHAM RD. B, NEAR PRICEVILLE

History 

This burial ground was used by people of African descent who started arriving late 1840’s to settle along the newly surveyed (Old) Durham Road. Location Tickets, issued after completion of the survey of the land and road in 1849, set the requirements for settlement. When these were fulfilled, Crown Patents could be issued. Many of the 16 families who arrived in spring and summer of 1849, came from Wellington County settlements near the Garafraxa Road (Wellesley and Peel Townships.) Most had originally come from the United States and it is assumed that largely they were refugees from slavery. All these settlers had been in Upper Canada for at least 8 years; many for over 12 years; others more than 20 years. The 1851 census shows almost every 50-acre lot along the Durham Road settled by a Black family with the parents born in the USA, while showing Upper Canada as the birthplace for many of their children. The 117 listed Black settlers actually represent 11% of the total 1851 Artemesia Township population.  

Over time, the Black settlement diminished. Some intermarried with White settlers and gradually integrated into White society. Many others left their marginal farms to seek paid employment in Owen Sound, Collingwood or other urban centers. In the 1930’s, the farmer who then owned the land reputedly removed the headstones, ploughed the land and planted potatoes. It is not known what happened to most removed headstones or remains, although rumors still circulate.

In 1989, a group of interested citizens formed the Old Durham Road Pioneer Cemetery Committee to restore the burial ground and register it as a cemetery. 1990 they found four headstones in a nearby pile of rocks. These were placed at the site in a display case and October of that year, Lieutenant-Governor Lincoln Alexander unveiled a memorial granite boulder which had an inscription that honored these early pioneers of African descent. In 2015, the Cemetery Committee refurbished the site. The original memorial is once again fully visible and thanks to a grant from the Ontario Trillium Foundation, the four historic grave stones are now safe-guarded from damage in a covered pavilion designed to evoke memories of cemetery dead houses, roadside chapels and rural structures such as log cabins and covered bridges. The monument, which is situated so as not to be atop any of the more than 80 unmarked grave-sites, symbolizes safe passage and is oriented due north, as a way to commemorate the many paths to freedom taken by refugees from slavery.

Cultural Significance 

The Old Durham Road Pioneer Cemetery and the Old Durham Road School across the road from it are among the few
remnants of a vibrant and successful Black settlement that existed near Priceville from the late 1840s. The fact that by the 1880 few of the original Black settlers remained, in no way diminishes their contributions as pioneers and exemplary role models who emigrated as free people or bravely fled as refugees from slavery.

Designation

By-law 2016-28 Municipality of Grey Highlands protects the actual location as well as all onsite structures and artifacts.

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property.

Photo Gallery

Coming soon

Sykes Cottage 

 BUILT 1860 BY SYKES FAMILY - 634842 PRETTY RIVER RD, NEAR ROB ROY (PRIVATE RESIDENCE)

History

The Sykes family operated a saw mill on the property where they also built this home. It is believed the house was constructed using timber milled on site. The mill operated for some 80 years and used both water and stream power. It was one of numerous wood mills operating on the rivers of the area, most of which had ceased operations by the 1970's. After early 2000 construction of a larger home on the property, the heritage designation preserved the cottage from demolition and it is now used as a guest cabin.

Architecture

The “board and batten” frame structure is representative of basic farm houses built by the earliest pioneers to meet the minimum requirements in order to obtain a crown deed. The story-and-a-half structure provides an upper sleeping area which in the earliest days may simply have been a loft accessed by a ladder. Gable windows and the dormers would improve ventilation and light upstairs which in many cabins was uninhabitable due to smoke.

Designation

May 25, 2004: By-law 2004-31 (Municipality of Grey Highlands). Specific features protected under the by-law are all building elevations including the original exterior and interior features: primary staircase, original wood trim, original wood floors, and original wall. (By-law is prior to 09-2006 so no statement of attributes).

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property.

Photo Gallery

Coming soon

Heritage Properties Listed under s. IV of the Ontario Heritage Act:

If property is listed under the Ontario Heritage Act

  • No restrictions or covenants are registered on the title of your property
  • Listing does not affect use of property as defined in zoning by-laws
  • you apply for appropriate building permits like any other property owner
  • No additional obligations are placed upon you before proceeding with renovations or additions to existing buildings or structures on your property

However:

  • If you plan to demolish a building or structure on your property, you are required to give 60 days advance notice to the Council of Grey highlands. Within that time period, Council, following consultation with the Heritage Committee, decides whether to begin the designation process under the Ontario Heritage Act to give long term protection to the property (or else to permit demolition)
  • In reaching a decision, Council and the Heritage Committee do not just consider historic and heritage factors, but also condition of building, ease of restoration, financial factors, etc.

Badjeros General Store

BUILT 1885 BY NEIL D. MCKINNON - 663164 GREY ROAD 63 - BADJEROS
Remains the center of this pioneering village.

History

Badjeros (originally named Snow Drift) was likely the first interior hamlet in Osprey Township, established when Captain Phillip Badgerow erected a tavern, circa 1851, on the road from Maple Valley to Dundalk (now county Road 9). Badgerow, Badgero, Badjero & Badjeros are all common variations on the name of the first settler. Two previous general stores built on the opposite corner both burned down. In 1885, carpenter James Potts was contracted to build the current structure for Neil McKinnon who operated the store until he moved west in 1904. George Bailey took over till 1910; then Jacob Hamilton. From 1937-1980, in addition to penny candy and the usual household needs, Harry Sipprell limited the need for “trips afar” by selling everything from toasters to TVs and all things in-between.   Following three other owners, Diane Colgan acquired the property in 1996. If you fancy being proprietor of a country store, this one is currently for sale.

Architecture

This simple, well-maintained, purpose-built structure is mostly unchanged except modification to the front porch. The triple-arched original windows are designed to allow maximum interior light. The extremely high ceiling of the main store, allowed for hanging large “necessaries” like washtubs, copper boilers and farm implements. Original wooden drawers, shelves & counters grace the interior. Early daily log books and other historic items are on display.

Cultural Significance 

The General Store in any pioneering settlement was of huge importance to the community. As detailed in “Pioneers in the Queen’s Bush”, slow travel over bad roads meant early settlers could rarely afford the time it took to reach larger commercial centres, so the store would stock not just food and kitchen staples, but lots of other needed items such as wool & dry goods for making clothing, bits of hardware, school supplies, tools, agricultural equipment, and a wide selection of other paraphernalia ranging from buckets to string to candles – in fact almost anything a pioneering homesteader might require on a daily basis. Customers would re-fill their own tins or containers with products such as coal oil, turpentine, sugar or flour that were stored in large barrels. Cash was in short supply, so farmers would bring eggs or produce or pails of wild berries to barter. The store keeper allowed “credit” against purchases with the outstanding balance on either side being paid in cash at month end. Surplus goods were collected together and taken by the merchant for shipment to larger centres, the cash from these sales providing him the means of paying itinerant salesmen for his mercantile stock. In continuous operation from the day it was built, the Badjeros General Store and Post Office always has been and still is hugely important to the life-style of residents in the somewhat remote agricultural community of Badjeros.

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property.

Photo Gallery

Coming soon

Eugenia United Church 

BUILT 1895-1897 BY ORANGEVILLE PRESBYTERY, 
ON LAND DONATED BY J. ROBERT HOGG
159 CANROBERT STREET
EUGENIA

HISTORY

Eugenia (named for Eugenie, wife of Napoleon III) first reached prominence in the Gold Rush of 1853, short-lived because the shiny bits panned out of the river actually were iron pyrite (aka Fools Gold).The village was later settled by immigrants largely of Scottish descent – i.e. staunch Protestants, perhaps attracted by the fact that Artemesia Township was declared a Wesleyan Mission. After the Orange Hall was built in 1874, Methodists held services there, and later on so did Presbyterians – all of them friendly with each other and working together on events like Orange Day Celebrations aka the Glorious 12th ( of July). In 1882 Methodists built their own church. Presbyterians broke ground in 1895 and members of the congregation worked together to erect the building in the following two years. As a whimsical touch, large foundation blocks containing iron pyrite were donated by various residents who finally saw no further reason for hoarding this mistaken treasure. Brick was brought by horse-drawn wagon from the Bowler Brickworks near Markdale. Reverend Wells provided the red and blue colored glass still in place today. All interior wood work, pews and other fittings were also crafted by church members. When church union created the United Church of Canada (1925), the two already friendly congregations joined to become the Eugenia United Church, which remains an important historical landmark and cultural hub for the hamlet of Eugenia. (The former Methodist Church was dismantled around 1940 to accommodate widening of the road).

Architecture

A simple rectangular structure in keeping with protestant tastes having a steep gable roof is largely clad in single-layer stretcher-bond red-brick, much enhanced by 6 rows of buff brick above the glittering foundation blocks and in a decorative band across the windows. The pointed Gothic arches are also skillfully delineated using carefully shaped contrasting brick. It is an unusual and imaginative feature that the double-hung windows with their interesting wood tracery will pull down from their pointed top. The red and blue glass while simple in concept greatly enhances the interior. Unfortunately, the decorative bell tower & gingerbread trims have not survived the snow and blow of Grey County winters.

Cultural Significance 

That the building was constructed entirely by volunteer labor and largely with donated materials is a testimony to the pioneering spirit of early settlers, as is the ongoing cooperation of the two congregations who in 1896 hosted an Orange Day supper for 200 in the unfinished Presbyterian basement. Now having a modern kitchen, the church basement continues to turn out church suppers and the annual pancake breakfast for Gold Rush Days. The church along with the main floor meeting room (added 1987) provides space for meetings & concerts. Eugenia United & sister Parish St. Johns Flesherton also operate the local food bank.

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property. 

Photo Gallery

Coming soon

Eugenia Hotel

BUILT 1886 BY PETER MUNSHAW
170 PURDY STREET
EUGENIA
(PRIVATE RESIDENCE)

History

Apparently Aaron Munshaw got into some financial difficulties, so to save Munshaw Hotel in Flesherton from creditors; he transferred ownership to his nephew Peter. According to family legend, when the difficulties were over, Peter was reluctant to return the property. Uncle Aaron resolved the problem by providing money for Peter to acquire Plan 20, Lot 21 of Mill Reserve 4 (crown deed 1873 owned by A. Purdy) & build his own hotel in what was at that time the prosperous community of Eugenia (named for Eugenie, wife of Napoleon III). Peter operated the hotel until his death in 1941 - during boom years when William Hogg’s interest in water power eventually led to construction of the dam and generating plant that created Lake Eugenia, and also during lean times when prohibition rendered the lovely mahogany bar all but useless. After 1946, the building operated as a rest home. Mid ‘60s owner Wayne Wickens tried to restore the building as a hotel/hostel for skiers in nearby Kimberley, but Grey was still “dry”, and ski-clientele wanted a place to party. Since 1974, the building has been a private home.

Architecture

Queen Anne Eclectic is almost an understatement in describing this unique building. A simple two-story gable-roof structure with attic rooms is greatly enhanced by gabled balconies off-set on each side, and just for good measure, another angled on the corner. Predominately of red brick, windows and doors are all accented by segmented buff brick voussoirs with a keystone, and the north end gable peak sports a whimsical checkerboard pattern. The dynamic brickwork is almost overshadowed by the decorative woodwork: gorgeous gingerbread, ornate railings, and fine examples of intricate cedar shingles in diamond and fish-scale pattern. The corner turret, reputedly an addition, likely appeared during 1895 repairs, but is in keeping with the general style. Although many interior elements have been lost; the original staircase with cherry newel posts and ash paneling remain, as does the 9’ high ash “back bar” with mirrors that displayed bottles of liquor and other saloon items.

Cultural Significance 

The hotel was a gathering place for villagers and a stopping place for travellers. In the 1890’s William Hogg was doing early experiments with generating hydro power. Sir Adam Beck likely stayed here to consult with Hogg, then later to oversee construction of the Eugenia generating station. This dominant heritage building in the still thriving hamlet of Eugenia is greatly in need of repairs & the present owner is wishing to sell it to someone interested in restoration.

Designation

Not yet but HGH deems the building worthy of designation before or after renovation.

Overview

Click here for a pdf overview of this property.

Photo Gallery

Coming soon

Hickling Farm

BUILT C 1875 BY JONATHON & ELIZABETH HICKLING
437132 8TH CONCESSION
ARTEMESIA
(PRIVATE RESIDENCE)

History

In 1873, Alexander Neilson, holder of an 1867 free crown grant, sold the property to the Hicklings for $1200. The house was built soon afterward. It is believed that Jonathon was uncle to well-known Flesherton merchant Fred Hickling who lived with them for about 6 months when he first arrived from England (1891). Legend has it that Fred operated his first store in one of their front rooms. Circa 1900 the property was bought by John Parsons who farmed there until his death in 1941, after which his son Ranald owned the farm until 1966 when it was sold to the Seminole Fishing Club. Shortly thereafter all but the back portion of the property (abutting the Beaver River) transferred to John Dales and his friend Jim Hickling, a descendant of the original owners. Hickling was bought out, and the property has been owned by the Dales family ever since. There is evidence of a lime kiln on the property (probably used for making mortar to construct the house) as well as a shingle mill and saw mill, both known to have been operated by the Parsons family.

Architecture

This house is best described as Wilderness Georgian, a description used by Ruth Cathcart on page 18 in “How Firm a Foundation. Although small in scale, Georgian classical balance is certainly apparent. The careful placement in alternating colors of squared fieldstone blocks, including wedge-shaped segments above windows and doors on the front façade is highly unusual. Research by the current owner indicates these stones are cut in the fashion of German masons using the heavy steel blade of a “guillotine” to cut each side of the stone into a flat face (unlike the locally more common practice of Scottish masons who squared only the exterior face leaving the gap between interior & exterior wall to be filled with rubble.) Also of interest is the wooden anchor-board above the first floor on two sides of the structure. This would have been included to provide for construction of a veranda, though no records show that one was ever built.

Cultural Significance 

A simple farmhouse situated on gently rolling escarpment terrain standing strong since 1875: a testament to the will and determination of pioneer settlers. 

Overview

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Hillside House

BUILT C.1900 BY C.J. SPROULE
338 MILL STREET
FEVERSHAM
(PRIVATE RESIDENCE)

History

Feversham, originally named Hungry Hollow, was founded by Edward Horton (1812–1864). Horton came to Osprey Township in 1853 and acquired 500 acres in the area where Feversham now stands. As the town grew around the dam and the mill which Horton established on his property, he subdivided some of his property into village building lots. In 1864 the hillside property (Plan 217, lot 17) was registered to John Sproule, Canadian born son to Irish immigrant James Sproule of Osprey. According to “Split Rail Country”, from 1850-1856 John Sproule was the first postmaster of “Artemesia Corners” (now Flesherton). He then was appointed treasurer to Osprey Township Council in 1859. Although it appears he made his his home in Osprey, John Sproule owned and operated a large mercantile business in Flesherton. His twin brother Dr. T.S. Sproule was an influential resident of Markdale. So it is safe to assume that when C.J. Sproule built the house at the turn of the century, he was a relative of this large family. Over the years, the home has changed hands many times.

Architecture

Many fine Regency Cottages are found in Grey County, but this style is quite rare in what is now Grey Highlands. Hillside House, so named because it sits on a hill, is a square bungalow with center-hall plan and a gently sloped hip roof. The essentially plain structure is enhanced by the use of white paint along the four lowest courses of brick as well as to create an interesting frieze across the window tops. The large covered porch which mirrors the shape and slope of the roof and also features white decorative railings and Gothic gingerbread adds greatly to the overall charm of the building. 

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Methodist Cemetery

ESTABLISHED C. 1855
LAND DONATED BY EDWARD HORTON
(NEAR) 494249 GREY RD 2 AT JOHN ST
FEVERSHAM

History

This small cemetery, similar to those found in many pioneering communities, is no longer in use. The heritage grave stones which were scattered about the site in pieces have been matched as best as could be and then embedded in concrete. The condition of all stone facings is poor and in urgent need of restoration. Edward Horton is buried here. Other names on headstones include: Vanmeer, Bowes, Cameron, Hudson, Elliott, McGirr. (More graves information: page 408, Osprey History Book).

Cultural Significance 

The historic importance of this site is the link with early pioneer and visionary Edward Horton, the founder of Feversham.  Edward Horton was born near Brockville Ontario, January 30, 1812. In 1850 he obtained lots 16, 17, 18 Concession 9-10 from the crown and by 1853 had cleared the land. In 1857 he received permission from Osprey Township Council to have part of his property subdivided into village lots along the Beaver River to create a settlement called Hungry Hollow (later changed to Feversham). Land for the Presbyterian and Methodist Churches as well as for a school and the cemetery were donated to the growing community. Horton had a dam built to harness water power for a saw mill, which was followed later by a grist mill. Edward Horton died January 15, 1864 at the age of 52 and was interred in the Methodist Cemetery. In 2012, as part of a week-long event celebrating the 200th anniversary of Edward Horton’s birth, a memorial plaque was placed there in his honor.

Overview

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Kimberley General Store

BUILT 1904-06 BY FRANK WEBER

235304 GREY ROAD 13
KIMBERLEY

History

The two-story brick building was started in 1904 on the site of a former blacksmith shop which had collapsed from snow load the previous winter. Although far from the first store or the only store in Kimberley, this was certainly the largest. February, 1906, Frank Weber opened his General Store for business; then 1912 turned it over to his brother Dave. From 1921 until December 1923 the building was home to the Bank of Montreal. 1927 the renovated building was re-opened as a store for the next 22 years. After 1949, the manager of the creamery lived upstairs and used the main floor for storage. 1967-1989, the building served as Euphrasia Public Library; then housed an art gallery from 1990 to late 2009 when it was acquired by Stacie Constantine who re-opened it as Kimberley General Store in May 2010, and since then has been restoring many original heritage features of this charming venue.

Architecture

This is a simple purpose-built structure of double-brick using a traditional common bond pattern. Like most general stores, the main floor has a very high ceiling to accommodate large items like tools or washtubs being hung up out of the way. The ample cellar would have been used for storage with additional storage and living space on the second floor. Originally the entry/porch was protected by an awning. The two-storey covered veranda added by Dave Weber in 1916 is very much in keeping with the design of other local general stores where a solid porch roof protects customers from Grey County winter snow, and in summer provides shade to visit with friends, enjoy a drink or a snack, admire the view of Old Baldy or just sit and watch the world go by.

Cultural Significance 

Kimberley, founded c.1850 became a bustling commercial hub with gristmills, saw mills, three blacksmiths, two hotels (one temperance, the other decidedly not) as well as various stores all serving the extensive agricultural community in Euphrasia Township. Changing uses for the building which includes periodically housing Kimberley Post Office, also reflects ebb and flow of the local economy: agricultural decline during the depression; an influx of new residents when local skiing became available. Most recently the beautiful local scenery, challenging terrain and relaxed life-style has attracted artists, hikers, bikers and retirees. The General Store has come full circle and is once again a focal point of village life as well as a popular stopping place for tourists. Residents and visitors alike enjoy the variety of locally produced foods, cosmetics, arts & crafts, as well as home-cooked lunches, and most recently pizza cooked in a wood-burning oven.

Overview

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McIntyre Church

BUILT 1879 – CONC. 5, PT. LOT 30
349431 4TH CONCESSIONB
MCINTYRE

History

McIntyre was named for four brothers of that name who originally settled the four one-hundred acre lots of the cross-roads (c.1850). By the 1860’s, the largely Scottish settlement was thriving agriculturally, but the small population was seriously divided over religious matters with at least two different sects of Presbyterians as well as Baptists and Congregationalists all having visiting clergy hold services in the school house. When the school became too small, a non-denominational log cabin was built with services open to all comers. Summers, starting mid-1870, a Presbyterian divinity student from Queens preached in Maxwell, Feversham and McIntyre. Deciding that all of the congregations could be united under guidance of whichever sect first built a proper church building, when he graduated in 1879, Rev. Dr. John Chisholm encouraged the entire community to build the church, and then served as the first minister until 1884. He returned fifty years later to celebrate the anniversary of what by then was McIntyre United Church: an important part of community life for the next 70 years, until closed in 2000. An annual service is still held the 2nd Sunday of June.

Architecture

This very simple structure devoid of elaborate decoration is typical of small country churches constructed by conservative protestant sects. Common-bond double-brick walls use locally made red brick (likely from Collingwood). The double-entry doors feature ornate hinges made by local blacksmith, Hugh Roberts. Gothic-style pointed-arch windows feature elegant tracery and provide lots of interior light. Windows and door are strikingly accentuated with contrasting white-yellow brick (probably from Proton). The interesting triangular finish to the bottom of the Gothic arches is unusual, as is the fairly solid barge-board trim on front eaves.

Cultural Significance 

Peace Plenty Progress (a History of Osprey Township) devotes 4 pages to historical happenings at this church which was obviously an integral part of spiritual as well as social life in a vibrant agricultural settlement. 

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Priceville Pioneer Cemetery

ESTABLISHED 1859 (CROWN LOT 9, KINROSS ST N)
405026 GREY RD 4
PRICEVILLE

History

Priceville Pioneering Cemetery, established on land donated by early settlers, has been inactive since May 25, 1951 after the burial of Euphemia MacPhee. (The above stone is wrong - records shows that her age at death was a few months short of 100 years.)
By 1950 the burying ground showed considerable neglect. Many stones were falling over or were broken. Some grave sites had sunken because the bodies had been moved to nearby McNeil Cemetery. Mid-1950’s, the Rev. L.W. Mould set about restoring some semblance of order. The only record available was a skimpy notebook with a few ranges (rows) written in, including some names. Rev. Mould aided by the local knowledge of Belle (McKinnon) Aldcorn and cemetery board Secretary-Treasurer, Emma (McConkey) Harrison took the book to the site where the three of them carefully went up and down the rows. Mr. Mould dug into earth and weeds to find fallen slabs and then made a map of the cemetery.
If you stroll through the cemetery, you will note that nearly all of the names are of Scottish origin, such as Stewart, McArthur, McCormick, McDonald, McKinnon, and McLachlan. Graveyard aficionados will be intrigued that in 1880, five members of the Reiley family, ages one to nine years, were all buried in a space of fifteen days! Today the scenic, peaceful site is maintained and managed as an extension of the McNeil Cemetery Board.

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Old Durham Road School

 BUILT 1882 - SS7 EST. 1853

113491 GREY RD 14

NEAR PRICEVILLE

(PRIVATE RESIDENCE)

History

The meandering route of Old Durham Rd likely was an aboriginal hunting trail. Some twenty years before Priceville was surveyed for settlement, properties along the western end of Old Durham Rd were settled by Black pioneers, some of whom were United Empire Loyalists like James Handy who reputedly received a land grant in 1826. It is likely that many other Black pioneers were refugees from slavery. A log school (c.1856) further west on lot 11 served the children of Black farmers as well as village children until a school was built in Priceville, 1865. At that time a new log schoolhouse was built on this site closer to the Black farms; replaced in 1882 with the present brick building. When Grey Highlands Secondary opened fall of 1968, SS 7 was closed along with all other one-room rural schools and students were bussed to McPhail School in Flesherton. Old Durham Rd School, now a private home, still has original blackboards.

Architecture

Built of locally made yellow brick in a common bond pattern with same-color raised quoins, the school house has a simple gable roof. Double-hung 6x6 windows (now modernized) had a modestly arched top. Two sturdy wooden entry doors (one each for girls and boys) fit a true arch opening on both sides of the porch. Being located at right angles to the interior class entry door is intended to reduce cold drafts blowing directly into the classroom. An interesting feature are three iron tie-rods that cross the building below the roofline between the windows. Now bolted into exterior wood stanchions, the rods were installed shortly after construction to remedy a structural problem – likely a tendency of the brick to bulge outwards due to the absence of external buttresses. A fourth iron rod running lengthwise ends in a large iron X on the exterior. Doing pull-ups or hand-over-hand traverses of the rods was a popular (if dangerous) student activity.

Cultural Significance 

Old Durham Road School and the Black Pioneer Cemetery across from it are among the few remnants of a vibrant Black settlement that existed near Priceville from perhaps as early as mid-1820’s. By the 1870’s many of the original Black settlers were gone. Some who were skilled tradesmen took jobs in Collingwood or Owen Sound where their descendants still live. Some intermarried and over time, dropped their Black heritage. Some may have lost their land through failure to register title, or their title may have been contested by other settlers. In addition to its significance to Ontario’s Black History, many later graduates of Old Durham Rd School went on to become prominent citizens. Farqhuar Oliver was MP for more than forty years (1926-67). The most famous SS7 graduate of all was Agnes McPhail - the first woman to sit in federal parliament as well as a tireless fighter for the rights of farmers and of women.

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Oscar Phillips House

 BUILT 1904 BY OSCAR PHILLIPS

13 COLLINGWOOD STREET

FLESHERTON

History

The house is built atop a hill, on a lot severed from behind Munshaw Hotel. Born 1881 on a farm in Artemesia Township, Oscar Phillips came to Flesherton in 1900 to learn the harness-making trade (probably at Heard’s Carriage-works). In 1909 he set up a harness-making and shoe repair business directly opposite his home, so each morning he merely had to descend the long set of stairs and cross over to his place of business. Oscar loved harness racing and his skill at making show harnesses for the sport was greatly prized. He drove a car until he was 80 and ran his business for fifty years, helped after 1933 by his son Bob, also a community icon very involved in local hockey. At some point (probably in a road improvement scheme) the stairs were removed and the hill buttressed with a cement wall. In 2001 the house was acquired by brothers: Jim and Stewart Halliday, the latter serving on the Council of Grey Highlands 2006 - present.

Architecture

The Second Empire style, popular for Canadian public buildings from about 1867 to 1900, mimics the Grand Boulevards of Paris created during the reign of Napoleon III. Private homes built in the elaborate Second Empire style were generally quite large and were intended to demonstrate wealth, status and sophisticated tastes. Although this building is unusually small for a Second Empire house, the usual stylistic details have been perfectly adapted. Attractive brickwork includes segmented brick arches in contrasting colors that flatter perfectly proportioned windows and doorways, all still having original glass. The central opening front door with its double rounded panes is especially tasteful. Ornate, decorative dormers painted in contrasting colors jut from the bell curve mansard roof. The extended portico allows a second floor balcony which originally had an ornate railing and is skillfully delineated by the signature up-sweep of the eaves. The crowning glory of this elegant little gem is the attractive grillwork framing a square belvedere which gives a fine view to the north. (This feature is sometimes called a Widow’s Walk because in British Coastal towns, wives of sea-faring men would hopefully look for their husband’s ship amongst the returning fleet, all too often only to learn they had been widowed that day).

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Southline Union Cemetery Badjeros

DEDICATED 1854
269202 SOUTH LINE
BADJEROS

History

The monument to Ira Badgero (son of Philip Badgero, an early hotel owner for whom the community of Snow Drift was re-named) states that Ira who died February 8, 1854 was the first burial in this cemetery. This likely refers to the first burial after the site was officially dedicated since records show that at least five others precede that date: Fifteen-year-old Lucinda Tupper (interred in Block C Plot 17 of the Old Cemetery 1849) was the first actual burial on the site. Elizabeth McKenzie and Neil McKinnon followed in 1852; then John Kyle and Donald McDonald in 1853. There are several stones that are unreadable in the cemetery but the names (prior 1854) are documented. For a complete listing of burials see Peace & Plenty, History of Osprey Township: pages 447-486.
Of four donations of land, the original land on top of the hill was donated by Philip Badgero (AKA Badgerow) prior to the first burial of 1849. When the cemetery was expanded in 1941, Lewis O. Moore gave the east extension receiving 6 plots as payment, Chester Miller gave the south extension receiving 2 plots as payment and Norman Priddle received 2 plots for the west extension.

Cultural Significance 

The hilltop, which offers scenic views, is dominated by an impressive war memorial erected after WWI. This still active burial ground is an integral landmark of great social importance to the small rural hamlet of Badjeros.

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Rob Roy School/Osprey Museum

 BUILT 1889 BY OSPREY TOWNSHIP

634632 PRETTY RIVER ROAD

ROB ROY

History

The village is named for Rob Roy McGreggor (1671-1734), a highland chief known as the Scottish Robin Hood, who was known as either a hero or a villain depending upon your own clan loyalties.  The first Rob Roy School, built in 1881, burned under mysterious circumstances in the spring of 1889. A tramp sleeping there overnight may have caused the fire, but missing poultry from nearby farms indicates that a late-night chicken roast may be closer to the truth. Student delight was short-lived, as school quickly reconvened in Thomas Freethy’s hot blacksmith shop which meant sitting on backless benches until the present building was completed in the fall of the same year. In 1965 the school was declared surplus and the community pooled resources to purchase it for a community activities center.

Architecture

Balanced classical proportion is enhanced by attractive and fairly unique brick-work in rust red with contrasting yellow brick in solid corner quoins and textured vousoirs above elegant door and window “fan lights”. Contrasting pilasters and an ornate frieze emphasize over-all design harmony. The symmetry of the structure is complemented by identical proportions and motifs in the vestibule. Complex stepped brickwork supports eaves and gable end of the roof. The school bell in the cupola will still ring. This fine building is recognized as one of the best preserved heritage school houses in the province.

Cultural Significance 

As in most rural villages, the school played an important part in the life of the entire community. School Fairs in the 1920s later turned into Field Days. Christmas Concerts were an annual event, except in 1925 when an epidemic of measles closed the school until late January. In 1967, a long-time resident who was asked for memories of this school claimed he’d spent his life trying to forget. Perhaps he was one of the more than 80 students kept in line by “Ferrier the Brute”, who daily cut fresh willow switches. Today Osprey Museum offers many activities and events to enhance the fabric of life in both Rob Roy and nearby Feversham. A more recently constructed shed houses a large display of antique farm equipment.

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Salvation Army Barracks/Osprey Museum

BUILT 1903 BY SALVATION ARMY

315 MILL BRIDGE RD

FEVERSHAM

History

The Salvation Army was founded in 1865 by William Booth, who broke away from the Methodist Church to minister to the poorest social outcasts in London’s East End i.e. Alcoholics, morphine addicts, prostitutes and other "undesirables" unwelcome in polite Christian society. The organization was modeled after the military, hence Booth was the General, ministers were officers, members were soldiers and the “church meeting hall” was called a barracks. In 1880 the Salvation Army expanded into North America, but often these “official officers” found a Salvation Army post already established by immigrants. Opposition to the movement was largely from owners of pubs and saloons whose livelihood was threatened by the Army’s strong support of alcoholic temperance.
An early Osprey “Salvationist” named Crawford donated land and money to an itinerant preacher who failed to attract members to his church. When the minister left, the Army took over the building. The Feversham Corps was formed Feb 6, 1886, the first Barracks was built in 1889 on Lot 15, Conc. 9 and by 1900 the corps had 50 members. When McGirr’s Hotel burned down in 1901, the town site was acquired for a new Salvation Army barracks, built in 1903 using volunteer labor and partially paid for with money raised at bake sales and 25¢ dinners catered by women members. Although the corps closed in 1921, the Feversham Barracks remained a Salvation Army Outpost until the closing service March 1995. Now Osprey Museum, the building is still used for a variety of community-based purposes.

Architecture

Built of local white brick made in Proton, the simple gabled structure with a covered vestibule is typical of small-town “church meeting houses”. Red brick defines the base and corners and greatly enhances the rounded windows. Foundation stones from the nearby Beaver River were drawn to the site by horses.

Cultural Significance 

Within the local community, the corps held weekly meetings, ran a Sunday school and hosted various social functions. Many Feversham Corps members went further afield to minister in hospitals, shelters and alcoholic centers or to assume Army administrative posts in Canada, at the UK headquarters and also Asia.

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Wilcock Farmhouse

BUILT 1892 BY WILLIAM WILCOCK

734048 WEST BACK LINE

CEYLON

(PRIVATE RESIDENCE)

History

Upon arriving 1871 from Yorkshire, England, William Wilcock purchased 3rd Conc. lots 158/159 from William K. Flesher, an early settler and entrepreneur for whom Flesherton is named and whom Wilcock had known “back home”. Flesher had paid $500 to H. Moore, Wilcock paid $600, some of which he re-couped when Flesher paid $322 in 1892 for rights to a flume to provide water from Wilcock Lake for the mills in Flesherton. In 1872, Wilcock married 16 year old Catharine Bentham and took her to live in his log cabin. By 1876, he added lots 160/161 to his holdings. Their typically large farm-family of nine children eventually outgrew the cabin, leading to the 1892 construction of the large stone house. The original log cabin remained attached to the back and was used as a woodshed, until converted to a sunroom in 1976. After William’s death in 1916, Catherine sold the farm. By 1926 the land was owned by Luther Duckett who farmed it for almost 40 years. In 1948 he sold off waterfront lots for $4800 around what is now called Wilcox Lake. In 1963 the remaining farm acreage and rather dilapidated house was purchased by the Matthew & Pippa Gaasenbeek who lovingly restored the building and have carefully maintained the property ever since.

Architecture

The generously proportioned fieldstone house is typical Ontario Gothic, with high-peaked gables adding much needed headroom to the upstairs rooms in the storey-and-a-half structure. The decorative gingerbread trim along eaves and bracketing porch pillars is a reproduction using local patterns. Although this sort of trim should have been part of the original design, it is unknown if any ever existed. The T-shaped floor plan is not common to Gothic farmhouses but Wilcock probably needed the space for his large family, so in true Victorian fashion he borrowed the design for Victorian era brick farmhouses while maintaining his preference for Gothic appearance and detailing. The construction is of double fieldstone walls filled between with rubble. The exterior wall is of “ashlar” construction i.e. a mason squared off the stones. In a 1974 book by Jean Brownbridge, the house is pictured with no veranda but the author speculated there was evidence that at least one had existed. The two present verandas are reasonably styled replicas and are located where the structure indicates a veranda was planned.

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Attributes required to designate or list a property under the Ontario Heritage Act

A property may be designated under s. 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act if it mets one or more of the following criteria for determining whether it is of cultural heritage value or interest:

  1. The property has design value or physical value because it:
    1. is a rare, unique representative or early example of a style, type, expression, material or construction method;
    2. displays a high degree of craftsmanship or artistic merit; or
    3. demonstrates a high degree of technical or scientific achievement.
  2. The property has historical value or associative value because it:
    1. has direct associations with a theme, event, belief, person, activity, organization or institution that is significant to the community;
    2. yields, or has the potential to yield, information that contributes to an understanding of a community or culture; or
    3. demonstrates or reflects the work or ideas of an architect, artist, builder, designer or theorist who is significant to a community.
  3. The property has contextual value because it:
    1. is important in defining, maintaining or supporting the character of an area;
    2. is physically, functionally, visually or historically linked to its surroundings; or
    3. is a landmark.

Contact Us

© 2018 Municipality of Grey Highlands |
Office Location:
206 Toronto Street South Unit 1, Markdale |
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 409 Markdale, Ontario N0C 1H0

Office Hours:
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Toll Free: 1-888-342-4059 |
Fax: 519-986-3643 |
info@greyhighlands.ca